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useful information, any >> i am the chair of the club of science and technology member- led forum. i'm your chair for today. we also welcome our listening and viewing audience, and we invite everyone to visit us online. now, it is my pleasure to introduce our distinguished moderator who helped us all together today's panel. he is a technology veteran with operating in investing experience in technology businesses and the ceo of a premier north american publication with data center facilities, virtual private clouds, managed hosted platforms in san francisco, los angeles, and a nationwide high- performance backbone. it is also the managing partner of excellent capital, a private equity firm investing in growth stage companies. previously, was the co-founder of centera, the leading provider of wireless base stations. prior to that, he worked at national semiconductor, where he led the development and commercialization of internet networking products. he has been -- he has a degree in management from stanford, an ms from the university of central florida, and a degree in electrical engi
francisco has been a leader in our technology community and our technology economy across our country and now we get to continue to play a role in being a leader bringing technology solutions to improve the lives of our residents here in our city. it's been a privilege to work on this project and to lead this effort the last two years and look forward to bringing the broader vision of free wi-fi across san francisco in the next few years with all the partners behind me today. this has been a strong collaboration on behalf of a lot of partners. in particular, google, sf city, our recreation and park department as well as our department of technology, and i want to thank all of those involved. this project started a little over two years ago with a conversation i had with an old family friend from google. and i want to take a moment to thank the entire google team that worked on this project. it's been two years, so, it's touched a lot of desks and had a lot of approvals and in particular want to thank veronika bell who is here from google for stepping p. up. google is providing a finan
, right -- it is really can we use all this cloud technology to takeoff structures down and across this down so now, i can change and 8% spent on a bunch of stuff that other people can go due to 80% i get to build applications, which power a very different experience. you think about what the car of the future might look like, it is a computer with four wheels, right? that is what it is. what they start to do with it, etc., is completely different. i'm talking about what we all conceptualize as a manufacturer. when you ask the question what will happen in the future? it is harnessing this technology to really deliver a service economy, and the companies that do this, the guys that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program w
support during this process. mayor lee has been an incredible friend to our technology community as doing incredible things for our great city. and, mayor lee, i want to thank you and introduce our great mayor, mayor ed lee. (applause) >> thank you, mark. welcome, everybody, to balboa park. and i know we have a couple of hosts and i want to meet and recognize of course our recreation and park department. phil is here. he'll speak in a minute. also recognizing john avalos, our supervisor for this district. but often a voice at the board in this city about issues of equity, and that is why i think it's important that we announced it at a place like balboa park. i live here just literally two minutes away, so, i often see this park completely crowded with so many families, especially with all the great improvements that rec and park has put in, in collaboration with the supervisor, because i know that some of his discretionary funding has often gone in to support efforts here and, of course, across the street with the challenges of the -- both the bart and the muni station. but it is all abo
technology partners, our communications partners, our department leaders, new ones as well as old ones, are saying this is just the beginning. this is literally the beginning of a continued effort to innovate, innovate, and innovate. and i like what mark said. not only are there no strings attached. really the benefits are targeted at our residents and our visitors, but that the only thing we're going to see is wireless connected to our fiber. we're learning that. we're learning that our fine and some of the backbones that we've always had to depend on can be improved on. i have to admit, the new director will also tell you we are behind. i call our self-the innovation capital of the world, but we're behind in many ways and we need to catch up. we need to do more, but sometimes the funding wasn't there and it costs more than we think and we're trying to figure things out and trying to get as modern as fast as we can. and this is where i think that relationship with the private sector, particularly with our technology and innovative companies in san francisco is so important to us, that
? >> sure. st. francis demonstrates well the evolution of elevated technology. and substantially damaged the 1906 earthquake and rebuilt in 1907 or 1908, and extend it again in 1913. then a new tower was added in 1932, so there is all sorts of elevator technology you can see at the st. francis that very much represents the building history of san francisco. >> i understand there is a really old elevator still operating here. >> that is right, the elevator installed in the 1913 expansion. we can go look at that. >> let's go take a look. here we are in a spectacular st. francis lobby. here is the clock. when people say "meet me at the clock in the st. francis." let's look at that elevator. >> ok, let's do it. >> here we are in the elevator installed as part of the expansion, and this is the way it was originally installed about 100 years ago. it has a manual switch just like elevators did back then, and it runs on dc power. this was from a time before elevators ran on ac power. >> when did they switch? >> decided to switch in the 1920's, so this elevator predicts that by about 19 years. th
and that will be live google plus streamed. all sorts of fun technology. but before the publication of her book, and the subsequent film, this was probably one of the most famous compositions by verm ere, certainly the most famous, and has three paintings and i love that the way that the clouds hang so low and it is actually much darker on my screen, but this kind of balance between the rain clouds and the white pufffy clouds and the way that they interacts with the buildings in the city. this competes with two other paintings in the exhibition and i will not say which ones they are and it competes for my favorite painting in the exhibition it is view of harlem with bleaching grounds in the foregrounds and one of the most important innovations for the 17th century, dutch landscape painters was the way that they approached the sky. for any of you who have traveled to the netherlands you know that there is a low horizon line and i have been told that the dutch people and i can be corrected. that they call their clouds the dutch mountains because the landscape is so low that really you get these m
wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these
's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," written by two economics professors. they write -- the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s. the portion of adults working is four percentage points below its peak in 2000. our question to you
a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot
there already but doesn't fill all the roof tops and there is new technology coming out all the time. we have been challenged in the solar technology arena because traditional technology has heavy weight technology that always challenged the integrity of roof tops, and moscone is the one we found and let that be for one of these companies and light ultralight technology and use, cheaper way of getting solar out there and we're going to allow them to demonstrate their product on top of our mos connie roof and that is an example we're doing in utilizing all of the agency's cooperations and make sure the start ups can use real testing sites in the city. that is thanks to the hardand kelly and the manager at puc and barbara hale and the second thing we're going to do is take a page out of what we're doing with clean tech and biotech life sciences. you see what mission bay is doing. they have for the last ten years building up a ecosystem of pharmaceutical companies and san francisco medical center and integrated around with the research teams to form a very strong research center and because of
cities. we are forming new partnerships for the very technology industry companies that are beginning and have been locating here in san francisco to help us create the new workforce. because if we don't can certainly create that workforce it'll be created by somebody else for other people. so we formed a training row graham in 19 san francisco residents of diverse backgrounds to the jobs in the tech sector called tech sf. they've already began to enroll their graduates into the very technology company that are successfully locating here in the city. as i said earlier, were making progress in our public school system. test scores are at an all-time high in truancy is down in our school district, where one of the highest performance entities in the state broadly satisfied with that because we know ours middle schools are not good enough. were going to get the good were going to get to parental engagement in our middle schools. that's where the downfall that the two lindsay is at. we will help them to exceed. we will deliver even more resources and tax. in fact, this year the city of sa
in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come. we call it onkelo. onkelo means hiding place. in my time, it is still unfinished, though work began in the 20th century, when i was just a child. work would be completed in the 22nd century. along after my death. >> michael madsen joins us now from san francisco. michael quite dramatic. why did you make this film? what was it that inspired you to take on this subject? >> it was very simple that the onkelo facility as it's called which means hiding place in finnish is building something in a foolproof manner that
connected through technology. in my lifetime technology has bridged the gap between not employed. i meet a resident who has connected to people all over the world and wanted others to have this experience so he started a computer club. i've seen the confidence go up. the club is set up so residents become trainers. everyone passed the skills forward. air royal they're part of the community and findings value in their talent. i urge you to employ seniors and people with disabilities in computer labs around san francisco. you have a golden opportunity to be a leader to show the rest of the in addition, the capped resources of people and seniors with disabilities. when you were looking at the budget keep in mind how technology has connected the community. there were none before. thank you for the opportunity to be heard >> thank you very much. >> thank you. next speaker, please >> why don't we keep doing. >> i'm jessica. >> hold on one second let's get the microphone on. we need the microphone victor >> now i can here myself. i'm confused of the programs. the seniors have ensured lot
through the city and county san francisco - >> good morning supervisors i'm alice i'm the technology coordinator. could i i want to ask you to continue your district funding. currently we're able to offer this service, however, this grant which has helped us serve over 4 hundred youth and adults will sunset on june 30th. without this funding for the youth and communities our lab will be unable to sustain it's program. today, the youth with me are just a few of those who use the technology daily. i've seen them development 20th century skills. please continue to connect our county with those resources. please help us to get the computer assess and thoughtful use service we need to have the right to have. thanks >> good afternoon board of supervisors. i'm matthew i work at the beau con center. due to those channeling economic times we've been hit with unemployment. it is home to the most diverse community. according to the status we're the lowest work group. as the district that has 9 percent of household living below the poverty level yet we receive zero dollars until we came last ye
sf thank you and today sports 6 hundred members of our technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking somebody in the eye and saying i care about where you're going and i don't want you to necessarily live the rough-and-tumble street life. get some she felt and food and take a moment and think about what's happening next week. we care about your background. we know there may not be other supporters in your life. we care about you a because we know about life and want to share >> compassion in san francisco. this is what project homeless is all about and hopefully with that opportunity something might occur
as they continue on the road to technology and on comprehensive immigration reform. to work within the time we have i'm going to dispense with long introductions but let me mention the enterprises. this people has gnltd from europe and she co- founded her company. born in columbia we have alexander he is the do founder of voice bunny and he's a recent father and returned almost right after his little girl was born to the white house to be honored and we'll be hearing about that. and the third narrator is the chief at bright sons. we received his masters in commuter science and other degrees from ucla. join me in welcoming our panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reu
've continued our cell 7 technology video. beautiful new eastern span going to make history. abc 7 news joins us live now. allen? 50 yeah. broken materials here in pleasanton is -- supplying asphalt for the nur bridge. elevateors behind me going to take clouds of rocks and expand mix it to create the asphalt. from here, it's a 37 mile wide down what is expected to be a very congested route. hundreds of tons of as fault. >> we want to get as much done before closure as we can. >> between friday, sunday, more than 6,000 truck loads will travel down i 580 during commute hours. >> we get back into night time hours traffic for these will be diverted back to 238 and 880. so only during peak hours will trucks be on 580 route autos roads expected to be congest sod caltrans will be monitoring traffic from command center, they can reroute necessary. >> it's to give people on the ground eyes in the sky to help them do their job. >> but first order of business tonight1p:& is demolition. crews making way to a new path to the new east span. >> they need to grind a path and have sat the tunnel. >> they'll by t
updates from the roads using cell 7 technology. abc7 news is on the move on the san mateo bridge which will be familiar for commuters for five difficulties. dick? >> eastbound on the bay bridge traffic is light and moving well. on highway 101 morning and southbound moving at the speed limit and traffic is light from south san francisco to the 101/ 92 interchange. >> thank you, dick. there is a convoy of trucks on interstate 580 during the compute hours with 6,000 truckloads of asphalt maybing the new bridge that could bring congestion to the roads. traffic will be monitored. the convoy of trucks can be rerouted if necessary. the asphalt trucks are diverted back to 880 overnight. >> despite the closure a bride and grandmother are moving ahead with plans to get married on treasure island and preparations are underway for the wedding planned months ago. treasure island weddings are a specialty with a million dollar view. the couple was shocked when they learned the bridge would be closed but caltran is providing access passes from treasure island to san francisco for the wedding party. we
and be ready in the science and technology or other fields of that era? will they be able to interact, appreciate and love and more diverse setting than we've ever seen before? our job today is for the answer and 2029 to be not just, yes we can, but yes, we did. it is now my honor to introduce the mayor of our great city and county of san francisco, and lee. i've known him and admired him since his days as a civil rights attorney at the asian law caucus. mayor lee has worked hard to keep the economy and economic recovery on track. to create jobs for our residents. mayor lee keeps his focus on making san francisco a city that celebrates diversity and leads the way in job creation innovation, education, healthcare, and the environment for future generations. mayor lee began his career in civil rights as a community activist. he later served as director of our san francisco human rights commission fighting for people who weren't able to have their voices heard. now as mayor, he continues the fight closing people i implement programs and services that help our most vulnerable communities
anymore. we use a moment magnitude. the richter scale was early technology. >> probably a myth that i hear most often is my building is just fine in the loma prieta earthquake so everything is fine. is that true ? >> loma prieta was different. the ground acceleration here was quite moderate and the duration was moderate. so anyone that believes they survived a big earthquake and their building has been tested is sadly mistaken. >> we are planning for the bigger earthquake closer to san francisco and a fault totally independent. >> much stronger than the loma prieta earthquake. >> so people who were here in '89 they should say 3 times as strong and twice as long and that will give them more of an occasion of the earthquake we would have. 10 percent isn't really the threshold of damage. when you triple it you cross that line. it's much more damage in earthquake. >> i want to thank you, harvey, thanks pat for >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have
technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of
this watch. >> reporter: arsenal manager enjoyed his first look at goal line technology, but for the world's most popular football league getting it right is a serious business. a goal needs to actually be a goal. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: the english premier league has pushed hard for the introduction of goal line technology since 2006, and in this new season they are the first league in the world to use it. the decision system is made by hawk eye, a familiar and successful device in tennis and cricket. in football a complicated process has been made very simple. >> whether you are in the stadium you will be able to see it, and certainly broadcasters will be able to see, you know, it was or it wasn't. it's not a review system, it's just a factual system. >> reporter: how does the system actually work. there are seven cameras on the ground, and when there is a contentious decision, within a second on this watch, it says goal and vibrates. so there's nothing debatable about it. there has been some present controversy over the technology in cricket, but not the part devised by pau
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
community, southeast asian community, all of them, they want to hear how they can innovate technology with everyone else and how they can improve lives ~. technology is there for our use and one of the reasons we support it is it's got to improve our lives for everybody. you cannot improve one's life if you're not communicating with people that speak spanish only. or in the shadows. this is why we're making this announcement. we're also making a timely announcement and adrian is very strategic on this because we are having a national conversation about immigration. we have to pass comprehensive immigration reform in this country. senate has done part of it. (applause) >> we have to get -- we have to get this agenda today rest of congress, to the house of cogv. it's a big, big challenge. the president, our senators, our leader pelosi, senator feinstein, they're all engaged. we have to push very hard. and i think our voices are going to be that much stronger if we add an additional 100,000 people on our way to citizenship because that's the full circle. and that's why we need immigratio
learned the nsa does not have the technological capabilities to adequately protect against american communications and a miss to communications from being collected. once this data is collected, it goes to a massive database and analysts can search these databases and touch american communications that goes against a court order. they basically said, what you're doing is unconstitutional. you have to put in new parameters to limit the search to protect americans. we don't know if it worked. we had it last week by the washington post that said thousands of abuses are still existing at the nsa. >> a shocking revelation as well. that core is supposed to provide adequate oversight and critics have called it it a rubberstamp court. does this back up either one of those claims? >> you mentioned the former judge that a sickly said, this is the third revelation where the nsa has misrepresented what it is doing with their authority here. judge bates notes that we can't know for certain how many people have been touched by this. that is the 56,000 number we have been talking about. this goes
50% in the last decade. >> my newspaper is going to take a cue from cutting edge technology such as radio and reality television by using product placement. now let's see how scoop bezos reports the international news. russian president putin today affirmed his support for the syrian government. nice word bezos. you just missed a huge revenue stream. russian president putin today affirmed his support for syria's government while enjoying a ice cold moxie soda. which it turns out is not disgusting. that taste. >> john: no serious news outlet would ever engage in that kind of shameless beverage. >> have you never seen the opening sequence of morning joe brewed by starbucks. >> john: i do think my point about serious news outlets stands. this is all window dressing, hodgeman. are you going to offer the readers anything substantively new in terms of actual content? >> of course. exclusive premium content. for those selective readers willing to pay an extra fee i will also send an actual human being the a place where news is happening. and that person will look around and ask que
by envision education, incorporated of its metropolitan arts and technology charter school, effective august 1st, 2013. roll call, please, ms. [speaker not understood]. yes, difficult need a motion. thank you. >> second. >> thank you. i heard motion and i just went right on. thank you for the second, vice president fewer. roll call please ms. castro. >> thank you. mr. logan? >> yes. >> ms. fewer? >> yes. >> mr. haney? >> yes. >> ms. maufas? >> yes. >> ms. mendoza? >> yes. >> dr. murase? >> aye. >> ms. wynns? >> aye. >> thank you. [speaker not understood]? >> yes. >> 7 ayes. >> now i'd hear a motion for 138-13 sp2 which is the resolution to accept the voluntary closure by envision of metropolitan arts and technology charter school effective august 1st, 2013. motion and a second. >> moved. >> second. >> thank you. may you please read the recommendation, mr. davis? >> yes, i will, thank you, president norton. superintendent's proposal 138-13 sp2 accept the voluntary closure by envision education, incorporated, of its metropolitan arts & technology charter school effective august 1st 2013 whereas
think, for example, our police department a we're working on with technology, another good example. one of these days we're going to have officers be able to dot reports while they're in their vehicles in the streets rather than coming back to their stations and spending 2 or 3 hours trying to do all the reports ~. we're working on that right now. but, you know, i think any city who needs the resources at their highest performance will look towards technology to help us reduce what we're doing today that could be done faster, quicker, and more efficiently and just as thoroughly. >> mayor, i think you answered this already, but i didn't quite hear her question. google is going to provide the financial [speaker not understood], correct? >> yes. >> after that what happens? >> well, first of all, i think we will make whatever proper investments we will have because we will consider this to be part of the infrastructure of our parks and recreation. as we do wi-fi in neighborhood corridors, we have infrastructure there. so, when i say that we are responsible, the city is responsible for infra
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 368 (some duplicates have been removed)